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BCIT Computing recognizes that Indigenous students are underrepresented in the student population and industry. In accordance with the Institute’s equity plan, to encourage and support Indigenous applicants, preferred candidacy will be given to Indigenous students in select full-time computing programs.

To be considered under this admission category applicants must:

  1. Self-identify as an Indigenous (First Nations, Metis and Inuit) person of Canada on the admission application.
    Documentation of status may be required upon acceptance.
  2. Have successfully completed the program’s entrance requirements.

Our programs also work closely with Indigenous Services at BCIT to ensure students receive the best possible support and encouragement while in the program. Please visit Indigenous Services for more information on available resources.

Check out the advice and experience from one of our Computer Systems Technology (CST) Diploma alumni.

Indigenous Scholarships & Financial Awards

Scholarships and bursaries are usually a non-repayable source of funds that help students with success while attending BCIT. A wide range of scholarships, awards, bursaries, and financial aid are available to Indigenous students to apply for. Please see the current list by visiting the BCIT Indigenous Services webpage on Scholarships & Financial Aid.

In partnership with TD Bank, the Computing Department offers bursaries and entrance awards specifically for Indigenous Computing students. Up to $20,000 per year is available in multiple computing programs:

  • Computer Information Technology (diploma)
  • Computer Systems Technology (diploma)
  • Full-Stack Web Development (diploma)
  • Computer Systems (BTech)
  • Digital Forensics and Cybersecurity (BTech)

Individual funding will depend on financial need (bursaries) or achievement (awards). Application forms are available on the BCIT Bursary webpage during the months of January, June and October.

Some advice from Rob Schulz, CST Alumnus

Rob Schulz, Computing alumnus, enterprise architect, and Shop First Nations founder

“My BCIT Computing education helped me immensely with where I’m at today,” says Rob. “Although the technical training was key for computer systems, the most valuable skills that have served me over the years are adaptability and teamwork.”

While Rob felt CST was great preparation for the workplace, it was a challenging program. He advises others to embrace the challenge, and know they will come out stronger and more confident in their ability to respond to change and find solutions. He also emphasizes the value of working in teams and prioritizing your homework.

His biggest single piece of advice? Manage your schedule to make the most of your time: “Ahead of your first semester, for example, this could mean taking some courses to lighten your initial workload.”

Finally, it’s not only about studying. Rob counsels, “Have fun, make friends – many of these connections will last a lifetime!”

Learn more about Rob