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Course details

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of heat, work and energy. The first law of thermodynamics is introduced and used to analyse engineering devices such as compressors, turbines, mixing chambers, cooling towers, heat exchangers and reciprocating engines. Both air, steam and refrigerants are used as working fluids. The second law of thermodynamics is used to evaluate the direction in which real processes occur. The concept of entropy as a property is introduced and used to evaluate irreversibilities in real processes and to quantify the efficiency of devices. Power and refrigeration cycles are introduced and the first and second laws are used to perform engineering analysis of the cycles. Laboratory demonstrations form part of the course.

Prerequisite(s)

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

Credits

3.0

Not offered this term
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Learning Outcomes

Properties, Processes and Working Fluids

  • Outline the basic definitions and assumptions used for formulating the macroscopic point of view of thermodynamics.
  • Specify whether an open system (control volume) or a closed system (control mass) approach should be used in a given thermodynamic analysis.
  • Use thermodynamic tables to determine properties of water, refrigerants and ideal gases.

First Law Analysis

  • Analyze thermodynamic cycles and processes (employing a variety of working fluids) using the conservation of energy principle.

Second Law Analysis

  • Express thermodynamic efficiencies of processes, cycles and devices in terms of entropy.
  • Sketch temperature-entropy diagrams for steam showing processes graphically on the chart.
  • Derive expressions for the entropy change of an ideal gas in terms of pressure, temperature and volume.
  • Apply the second law of thermodynamics for a control volume.

Power and Refrigeration Cycles

  • Evaluate the thermal efficiency of a cycle.
  • Compute the increase in efficiency due to reheating or multistage compression in cycles.
  • Analyze cycles such as the Otto, Diesel, Ericsson, Brayton and refrigeration cycles.

Mixtures and Psychrometrics

  • Use P-v-T relationships for mixtures of non-reactive ideal gases solve thermodynamic and mixing problems.
  • Analyze air conditioning processes such as dehumidification with heating, evaporative cooling, heating with humidification, the adiabatic mixing of two streams and the wet cooling tower.
  • Apply the first law to analyze processes involving chemical reactions such as the combustion process.
  • Use the second law of thermodynamics.

Effective as of Fall 2003

Related Programs

Thermodynamics (ELEX 7030) is offered as a part of the following programs:

School of Energy

  1. Electronics
    Bachelor of Technology Part-time

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  • Privacy Notice: The information you provide will be used to respond your request for BCIT course information and is collected under Section 26(c) of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). For more information about BCIT’s privacy practices contact: Associate Director, Privacy, Information Access & Policy Management, British Columbia Institute of Technology, 3700 Willingdon Ave. Burnaby, BC V5A 3H2, email: privacy@bcit.ca.