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Restoration of Freshwater Aquatic Ecosystems ECOR 9304

Ecological Restoration Part-time Studies Course

Course details

​This course will give a detailed overview of freshwater restoration techniques used primarily to mitigate losses of salmonid habitat and stocks. The spectrum will examine physical, chemical, thermal, and biological restoration technologies used in this province, some of which are new and innovative, while others have been used extensively over the last 100 years. Aspects of this course will include; spawning channels, fish ladders, development of off-channel habitats, in- stream woody debris placement, lake fertilization, stream fertilization, hypolimnetic cold-water withdrawal, mitigation of Total Gas Pressure (TGP) supersaturation at dams, lake destratification, hypolimnetic aeration/oxygenation, fish passage and culvert re-design, and biomanipulation. Students will participate in a one-hour seminar discussion each week with specific emphasis on critically reviewing the concepts and their application to ecological restoration. Seminar topics will follow directly from the lecture material and be guided by leading questions. Students will prepare and lead each seminar discussion with guidance from the instructor. Students that have taken RENR 8102 would not be able to take this course for credit in the M.Sc. program.Students will require a laptop and access to the internet to complete some in-class assignments. Field trips will emphasize the concepts discussed in class.

Prerequisite(s)

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

Credits

5.0

Unavailable
This course isn't currently offered through BCIT Part-time Studies. Please check back next term or subscribe to receive email updates.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Conceptualize salmonid spawning requirements in terms of basic design criteria and ecological requirements.
  • Evaluate the use of fish ladders in British Columbia including those on local North Shore streams.
  • Apply the objectives and criteria for design of off-channel salmonid rearing habitat for their construction at any given location.
  • Monitor the design and production of off-channel salmonid rearing habitat structures.
  • Evaluate where, when and how large-woody debris habitats used by fish in both main-channel and off-channel ecosystems should be constructed.
  • Explain lake/reservoir and stream baseline assessments, treatment assessments and commonly used methodologies for fertilization to restore fish production as implemented in British Columbia.
  • Assess how hypolimnetic water withdrawals can assist in lowering temperatures in streams for fish.
  • Apply the concept of gas supersaturation (Total Gas Pressure TGP) in water and its effect of fish (Gas Bubble Trauma GBT) in the context of mitigating these at dams.
  • Analyze the processes and benefits of lake destratification and hypolimnetic aeration/oxygenation in British Columbia.
  • Assess when and where culverts require re-design and re-construction to allow for fish passage, daylighting of streams and restoration of urban water quality and stream flow.

Effective as of Fall 2016

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