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Course Outlines

ENGL 1177

Academic Writing

School School of Computing and Academic Studies
Program Liberal Studies Department
Course Credits 3
Minimum Passing Grade 50%
Start Date September 07, 2021
End Date December 17, 2021
Total Hours 45
Total Weeks 15
Hours/Weeks 3
Delivery Type Other
Pre-requisites C+ in Grade 12 English.
CRN 43588

Acknowledgement of Territories

The British Columbia Institute of Technology acknowledges that our campuses are located on the unceded traditional territories of the Coast Salish Nations of Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), səl̓ilwətaɁɬ (Tsleil-Waututh), and xwməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam).

Instructor Details

Name Robin Dahling
E-mail Instructor to provide
Location
Office Hours Instructor to provide

Course Description

This course introduces students to the principles of university-level writing and critical reading. Academic writing focuses on the study and application of the principles of university-level discourse, with particular emphasis on exposition and persuasion. Students will read and analyze essays, and write their own compositions. In several language workshops, students will also learn fundamental strategies for developing an effective prose style.

Course Learning Outcomes/Competencies

Upon successful completion, the student will be able to:

  • Identify and compose a variety of sentence types to achieve a given aim
  • Analyze and compose paragraphs of different structures
  • Identify and compose thesis statements suited to a given purpose
  • Analyze the stylistic qualities of essays having a variety of rhetorical purposes
  • Critically read and compose expository essays
  • Critically read and compose persuasive essays
  • Compose essays that present a critical analysis of an essay or article or part of one
  • Write effective summaries of an essay or article or part of one

Learning Resources

Required Textbooks:

  • (1) BCIT ENGL 1177 Academic Writing Readings Custom courseware
  • Additional course readings and electronic materials will be provided on the Learning Hub.

Course Goals

Course Learning Outcomes:

  1. Conduct academic research, summarize it, use it for research essay and analytical/evaluative essay writing.
  2. Become aware of form, function and style for academic essay writing and why it is important.
  3. Understand the need to provide support for your academic essays.
  4. Understand how to distinguish strong from weak sources.
  5. Using quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing to support your paper.
  6. Understand the function, structure, and effective development of essay forms (including, but not limited to Thesis development, Paragraph structure, unity, and cohesion, and Conclusions).
  7. Learn how to critically read and utilize sources, and how to critique them.
  8. Learn to proofread your writing.
  9. Learn what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it completely.

Evaluation Criteria

Criteria % Comments
Literature Review15Due Week 6
Research Essay15Due Week 10
Evaluative/Analytical Essay20Due Week 15
Final Exam30Week 15
Participation20Consists of Discussion Board submissions and Peer Assignment Reviews

Course Schedule and Assignments

Tentative Weekly Syllabus – ENGL 1177

Week

Course Details

Week 1
Sept 7 - 12

Week 1 – Course Introduction & The Literature Review

Class Discussion

  • Course and Teacher Introduction

Readings:

  • Read Dahling, R. (2020). ENGL 1177 – Week 2 - Literature Review

Assignments:

  • Post profile in Profile discussion topic area
  • Answer questions in Week 1 Literature Review Discussion Board by Friday 2000h.
  • Respond to at least TWO (2) classmates by Sunday midnight.

Week 2
Sept 13 - 19

Week 2 – Researching

Class Discussion

  • Introduction to Researching
  • Strong vs. Weak Sources
  • Digital Researching Tools
  • Critical Thinking and the Need to Support

Readings:

  • Gribben, M. (2012). Gathering information. In M. Gribben, The Study Skills Toolkit for Students with Dyslexia (pp. 59-70). London: Sage Publications LTD.
  • Williams, J. (2020). Where to find good research and how to reference it properly. In J. Williams, How to read and understand educational research (pp. 29-45). London: Sage Publications LTD.

Assignments:

  • Answer Week 2 – Researching and Resources Assignment Questions on Discussion Boards
  • Respond to at least 2 other classmates in Week 2 Discussions
  • Work on selecting your subject and doing your pre-research.

Week 3
Sept 20 - 26

Week 3 – Referencing

Class Discussion

  • APA Citation Format
  • Citations/Referencing
    • Integrating sources
    • Quoting
    • Paraphrasing
    • Summarizing
  • Plagiarism
  • MS Word Referencing Tools

Course Reader:

  • Giltrow, J. (1991). Your own words. In J. Giltrow, Academic Writing (pp. 13-21). Peterborough: Broadview Press.

Additional Readings:

  • American Psychological Association. (2019). Concise guide to APA style (7th ed.). Washington.
  • Dahling, R. (2020). ENGL 1177 – Week 3 – Referencing Sources Part I – Quotations, Paraphrase, and Summary handout.
  • Hacker, D., & Sommers, N. (2016). APA Referencing. In D. Hacker, & N. Sommers, A Writer's Reference with Resources for Multilingual Writers and ESL (8 ed.). Beaverton: Ringgold Inc.
  • Hacker, D., & Sommers, N. (2016). Documenting Sources. In D. Hacker, & N. Sommers, A Writer's Reference with Resources for Multilingual Writers and ESL (8 ed.). Beaverton: Ringgold Inc.
  • Swales, J. M., & Feak, C. B. (2012). Writing Summaries. In J. M. Swales, & C. B. Feak, Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills (3 ed., pp. 188-227). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
  • BCIT Library Services – APA Citation
  • BCIT Student Guide to Plagiarism

Assignments:

  • Answer Week 3 – Researching and Resources Assignment Questions on Discussion Boards
  • Respond to at least 2 other classmates in Week 2 Discussions

TOPIC APPROVAL MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN WEDNESDAY 1800h

Week 4
Sept 27 – Oct 3

Week 4 – Thesis, Body, and Conclusions

Class Discussion

  • Thesis Development
  • Body Structure
  • Conclusions

Readings:

  • Dahling, Robin. “Different Types of Conclusions”
  • Hacker, D., & Sommers, N. (2016). C5 Writing Paragraphs. In D. Hacker, & N. Sommers, A Writer's Reference with Resources for Multilingual Writers and ESL (8 ed.). Beaverton: Ringgold Inc.

Week 5
Oct 4 – 10

Week 5 – Planning, Drafting, and Writing

Class Discussion

  • Planning/Brain-Storming
  • Outlining/Drafting
  • Writing

Additional Readings:

  • Hacker, D., & Sommers, N. (2016). C1 Planning. In D. Hacker, & N. Sommers, A Writer's Reference with Resources for Multilingual Writers and ESL (8 ed.). Beaverton: Ringgold Inc.
  • Hacker, D., & Sommers, N. (2016). C2 Drafting. In D. Hacker, & N. Sommers, A Writer's Reference with Resources for Multilingual Writers and ESL (8 ed.). Beaverton: Ringgold Inc.

Assignment

  • Complete Week 5 – Sample Essay Marking Assignment on Discussion Boards.
  • Begin writing your Literature Review (if you have not already started)

Peer-review each other’s work (Submit by Friday June 4th; Return by Tuesday June 8th)

Week 6
Oct 11 - 17

Week 6 – Literature Review Submission

Literature Review Assignment Due Friday October 15th, 2000h

Week 7
Oct 18 - 24

Week 7 – The Research Essay

Class Discussion

  • Research Essays

Course Reader

  • N/A

Additional Readings

  • TBD

Assignment

  • Start outlining research paper

TOPIC APPROVAL MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN WEDNESDAY 1800h

Week 8
Oct 25 - 31

Week 8 – Proofreading, Reviewing, and Revision

Class Discussion

  • MS Word Review Tools
  • Peer Reviewing Approaches in Depth

Readings:

  • Austin, R. (2019). Writing academically: Language, voice and style. In R. Austin, The Trainee Teacher's Guide to Academic Assignments (pp. 59-74). London: Sage Publications Ltd.

Week 9
Nov 1 - 7

Week 9 – Rhetorical Agenda and Audience

Class Discussion

  • Rhetorical Agenda
  • Audience

Course Reader:

  • Austin. R. (2019). Constructing an argument. The Trainee Teacher’s Guide to Academic Assignments.
  • Govier, T. (2010). What is an argument and what is not. A Practical Study of Argument 7e.

Assignment

  • TBD

Peer-review each other’s work (Submit by Friday July 2nd; Return by Tuesday July 6th)

Week 10
Nov 8 - 14

Week 10 – Understanding Genre and Rhetoric

Research Essay Due Friday November 12th, 2000h.

Week 11

Nov 15 - 21

Week 11 – Analysing and Evaluating Arguments

Class Discussion

  • Forms and Structures of Argument
  • Analysis of Arguments
  • Logical Fallacies

Course Reader:

  • Behrens, L., & Rosen, L.. (2006). Critical reading and critique. Writing and Reading across the Curriculum (2nd brief ed., pp. 24-38). New York: Pearson Longman.

Additional Readings:

  • Eales-Reynolds, L-J., Judge, B., Jones, P., & McCreery, E. (2013). “Developing your critical thinking skills: Reading critically.” Critical Thinking Skills for Education Students 2e. London: Sage Publications.

Assignment

  • TBD

Week 12
Nov 22 - 28

Week 12 – Critiques I

Class Discussion

  • Critical Approaches to Reading
  • Critiquing readings

Reading:

  • TBD

Assignment:

  • Read provided text and Post Critique #1 to Discussion Board
  • Respond to at least TWO (2) classmates’ critiques.

TOPIC APPROVAL MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN WEDNESDAY 1800h

Week 13
Nov 29 – Dec 5

Week 13 – Critiques II

Class Discussion

  • Feedback on collective approaches to Critique I

Reading:

  • TBD

Assignment:

  • Read provided text and Post Critique #2 to Discussion Board
  • Respond to at least TWO (2) classmates’ critiques.

Week 14
Dec 6 - 12

Week 14 – Materials Review/Study Week

Class Discussion

  • Feedback on Critique 2

Reading:

  • TBD

Assignment (Optional):

  • Read provided text and Post Critique #3 to Discussion Board

Peer-review each other’s work (Submit by Friday Dec 10th; Return by Tuesday Dec 14th)

Week 15
Dec 13 - 19

Week 15 – Final Week

Evaluative/Analytical Essay due Friday August 13th, 2000h

Final Exam Week – Dates TBD

BCIT Policy

Any student who needs special assistance in the event of a medical emergency or building evacuation (either because of a disability or for any other reason) should promptly inform their course instructor(s) and Accessibility Services of their personal circumstances.

Human Rights, Harassment and Discrimination:
The BCIT community is made up of individuals from every ability, background, experience and identity, each contributing uniquely to the richness and diversity of the BCIT community as a whole. In recognition of this, and the intrinsic value of our diversity, BCIT seeks to foster a climate of collaboration, understanding and mutual respect between all members of the community and ensure an inclusive accessible working and learning environment where everyone can succeed.

Respect, Diversity, and Inclusion is a supportive resource for both students and employees of BCIT, to foster a respectful learning and working environment. Any student who feels that they are experiencing discrimination or harassment (personal or human rights-related) can confidentially access this resource for advice and support. Please see Policy 7507 – Harassment and Discrimination and accompanying procedure.

Students should make themselves aware of additional Education, Administration, Safety and other BCIT policies listed at https://www.bcit.ca/about/administration/policies.shtml

Guidelines for School of Computing and Academic Studies

Attempts:
Students must successfully complete a course within a maximum of three (3) attempts at the course. Students with two attempts in a single course will be allowed to repeat the course only upon special written permission from the Associate Dean. Students who have not successfully completed a course within three attempts will not be eligible to graduate from their respective program.

Approved

I verify that the content of this course outline is current.
Robin Dahling, Instructor
September 04, 2021

I verify that this course outline has been reviewed.
Michael Bourke, Faculty
September 04, 2021

I verify that this course outline has been reviewed and complies with BCIT policy.
Patricia Sackville, Associate Dean
September 04, 2021

Note: Should changes be required to the content of this course outline, students will be given reasonable notice.